The Graffiti of Grace

nice shot!

Whimsygizmo's Blog

2011-02-25 at 16-21-12

You write it on
doorposts
and bridges
and walls
and inevitable falls
and failings.

You paint it in
sunrise
and sunset
and across star-stung skies
and in the tattoo
of shadows.

You stitch it into
hearts, tiny etched
mendings,
sacred scars.

It is
radical
and ridiculous
and readily available
and we forget
and we cheapen it
and we take it
but forget
to give it.

It is
free
and we’re found
gently loosed and unbound;
but we forsake it,
and forget
to live it.
…..

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Was The Irish Famine Genocide?

interesting stuff….

Whistling In The Wind

Somepeopleclaim that the Great Famine was an act of genocide committed by the British Empire against the Irish people. This theory is most popular among Irish-Americans (who strangely enough are more nationalist than people from Ireland) and on the internet, though it has little if any credence in Ireland. It has been booted out of conspiracy theory land after one of the most respected Irish historians; Tim Pat Coogan supported the allegation in his newbook, The Famine Plot.

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Parenting Politics…In My House

cool post…

The Mamafesto

With heavy media focus on Yahoo!’s Marissa Meyer and Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, it’s no wonder that the topic of motherhood is as newsworthy as ever. Yet, this focus seems very narrow, limiting the discussion solely to mothers and work, when in reality we could stand to broaden the conversation to both parents and how they manage the work/life balance. Motherhood doesn’t exist in a bubble, and if we want to discuss the challenges facing working mothers, it would behoove us to look at how entire families manage their balancing acts. I’m not the only one who’d like to see a shift in how we talk about these things.

My friend Annie from PhD In Parenting –  who has written about Meyer and Sandberg before –  is eager for the focus on the work/life balance to move beyond a women’s issue to one that is a parenting issue. In hopes of widening the…

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Quoth the Raven . . .

good post!

Seeker of Truth

Dénouement:  the final outcome of the main dramatic complication in a literary work; the outcome of a complex sequence of events; the end result

Nothing is more clear than that every plot, worth the name, must be elaborated to its dénouement before any thing be attempted with the pen. It is only with the dénouement constantly in view that we can give a plot its indispensable air of consequence, or causation, by making the incidents, and especially the tone at all points, tend to the development of the intention.

Edgar Allan Poe - Portrait

In 1846, a year after “The Raven” was published, Edgar Allan Poe wrote “The Philosophy of Composition”, a prose essay explaining his famous poem. A friend and former employer of Poe’s, George Rex Graham (who had declined to be the first to print “The Raven” — a poem he didn’t like — the previous year), would publish the essay…

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When the future comes, what are we all going to do with it?

this got me thinking… hmmmmm

Orkinpod

Last week I wrote about whether or not we really needed economic growth, and I claimed that the central problems facing our economy and our society were not about the size, scale, or growth of our economy, but rather about some deeper, undisclosed set of problems. This week I am trying, haphazardly and tentatively, to work through what those problems might look like. Also to predict the future.

One of the things that bothers me about economics—both in its academic guise as a social science discipline and its neoliberal political guise as a quasi-religious faith in which bankers and CEOs serve as high priests—is its general failure to talk about what it’s for. Historians have a whole subfield, historiography, dedicated to how and why we write history. But because the economy is so self-evidently important to the fabric of our society, economists get a kind of pass. Economics is important…

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Say a Little Prayer for You.

prayers are as powerful as hugs… 🙂

path: ethic.

I never really enjoyed church when I was growing up. The church experience comprised:

hard wooden pews, shiny and still smelling of polish.

itchy wool tights, and patent leather shoes.

few or no other children to play with afterwards.

hours out of my Sunday, which could have been better spent reading.

It was a boring, lonely, and uncomfortable experience, during which the priest would issue that invitation – ‘Let us pray’ – and everyone would bow heads and close eyes. I tried to pray, but it never seemed very real. Even then, I didn’t really feel like anyone was listening to me. Perhaps I was in the wrong church? Perhaps I was saying the wrong prayers? Or perhaps there really wasn’t anyone listening?

For whatever reason, I never found the relevance in church, so once I was able to, I stopped going. I don’t miss it, and I haven’t stepped…

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The Quiet Contemplation of Inactivity

good point!

Consistently Contradictory

Genevieve_Bell_The_Value_of_BoredomIf you are of a certain age, or perhaps above a certain age, there was a time when we didn’t carry computers on our hips. When we watched t.v., there was snow and fuzzy reception. Antennas had to be twisted after a storm or to pick-up certain stations. Instant replay wasn’t invented so we could admire the artistry of the swing or replay the magical putt from 45 feet. Replay was born out of desperation: We needed to see everything twice to make up for the blurry image the cathode tube produced. HD television means never having to ask “did his feet land in bounds?”

And if you wanted a crystal clear image of nature, you had to go outside.

If you are of that certain age, you spent a good bit of your time outside because sitting inside for too long often resulted in holding the stupid end of…

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No, Fair Systems are Not Fair

good point you got here…

a flock of crows

Another week in the world of education, and another teenager, Ms Suzy Lee Weiss, has gone through the epiphany after several university rejections that university admissions systems are not fair. Well, no crap Sherlock.

Yes, yes, her writing is satire. Yes, it’s tongue-in-cheek and self-deprecating; she’s got so much wit and cleverness that she’ll go far…yada yada yada yawn. That she’s smart enough to write a piece of social commentary and not appear stupid on television isn’t really that amazing. There are many teenagers, all across the world, at many different ages, who are capable of the same things. It’s not a magic Midas touch, it’s simply a matter of temperament. Yes, she’s clever, but she really shouldn’t be afforded some special attention just because she’s pointed out what most people have known for ages:

Fair systems are not really fair.

Actually, I can’t think of a system that

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